Falls Field Lodge

Type: Boutique Hotel, Mixed Use (RIT Design Project)
 
Location: Rochester, New York
 
Task:
To create a net-zero boutique hotel in the High Falls area.  As an area very well suited for a potential hotel location with a view of the water feature,  this project capitalized on an underutilized piece of property and proposed a boutique hotel operation on site with a view of the falls.
Summary:

Blending with the history of the neighborhood, the industrial nature of the surrounding blocks, as well as the recreational and city gathering history of the site, an industrial theme with a focus on play was carried throughout the program.  Modern timber framing using Dowel Laminated Timber (DLT) recalls the structure of older manufacturing buildings while capitalizing on the the newest technology with  a sustainable focus.

Net zero energy was also a focus on the project.  Daylighting and solar PV collection was a foremost consideration when designing and orienting the building.  An innovative system within the project is the micro-hydro electric generation utilizing storm runoff from the roof and channeling it into an existing storm drain that drops the entire height of the Genesee River gorge.  A pelton turbine at the bottom generates electricity off of the falling water before returning it to the riverbed.

Concept

LEGEND:

    A.  EXISTING PARKING LOT TO REMAIN

​    B.  NEW PLAYGROUND

    C.  EXISTING BUS SHELTER TO BE ENHANCED

    D.  GUEST DECK

    E.  PULL OF FOR CHECK-IN, DELIVERIES & LOADING

    F.  HIGH REFLECTIVE ROOFTOP WITH PV AND                                   INTEGRATED WIND TURBINES

    G.  FALLS FIELD, PARKING UNDERNEATH

    H.  EXISTING UTITLITY STRUCTURE TO BE ENHANCED

     I.  EXISTING OVERLOOK TO REMAIN

    J.  NEW LOWER DECK TO BE CONSTRUCTED IN OLD                       FOUNDATION

    K.  PROPOSED MIXED USE BUILDINGS

    L.  PARKING STRUCTURE​

Site Plan

PROJECT FEATURES:

  • Ground floor restaurant space

  • Bar and multi use space in lobby overlooking falls

  • Billiards room

  • "Bounce ROC," a family friendly entertainment venue

  • Underground parking

  • Rooftop restaurant space

  • Water catchment and turbine system using existing storm drain infrastructure to generate power

  • Enhanced overlooks to the falls

  • 44 guest rooms

  • Fitness center

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Floor Plans (Click to englarge)
Ground Floor
First Floor
Typical Upper Floor

RIVERVIEW ELEVATION

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THE SIMPLE STANDARD
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THE CITYLOFT SUITE
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"Bounce ROC"
FAMILY ENTERTAINMENT VENUE
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DIY BAR
PROJECTS & CRAFTS WITH A DRINK
ADDITIONAL PHOTOVOLTAIC GENERATION

 

Using the roof area that is not designated for the restaurant use to generate electricity is another option available to the developer.  While prices, efficiencies, and outputs vary by manufacturer, a simple calculation has determined that the annual electricity that could be generated on site is 118,855 kWh.  If multiplied by the residential rate for electricity (14 cents per kWh), the resulting savings are about $16,639 annually.  Commercial rates would have to be viewed to give a more accurate picture.

118,855 kWh annually
$16,639 annual savings
THE MICRO-HYDRO SYSTEM

 

In this scenario, it was determined that the project's entire roof area was 13,969 square feet.  For an example analysis, a 2-year storm rainfall rate was used for 6 hours.  All rainfall drained to a single tank which then fed water at a consistent pressure down the storm collection system to the turbine 109 feet below.  The results of this was that the rainwater alone could generate 293.8 kWh of electricity.  For reference, an average residential home in New York State uses about 6,500 kWh per year, or 541.6 kWh per month.  Therefore this one storm event could generate half of a typical homes power supply in 6 hours.  The next step would be to see potential hotel loads in order to see payback periods.

293.8 kWh electricity
per 2-year storm rain rate 
for 6 hours.
This is approximately 2 weeks of a residential homes electrical needs, generated in 6 hours from rainfall.
293.8 kWh electricity
per 2-year storm rain rate 
for 6 hours.